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TABLE 1
Birth Rates for All Less Developed Areas of over 500,000 Population Designated by the United Nations as Having "Virtually Complete" Vital Statistics, 1950-1969
Average Birth Rate					Latest Birth Rate	
	1950-54	1955-59	1960-64	1965a	Year	Rateb
LATIN AMERICAN REGION						
Chile	33.7	35.9	34.8	31.9	1967	30.9
Costa Rica	49.1	49.1	44.8	40.0	1968	37.7
El Salvador	49.0	49.3	48.6	44.4	1969	41.9
Guatemala	51.3	48.7	47.7	44.0	1968	42.5
Guyana	42.9	43.6	42.0	38.2	1968	35.1
Jamaica	34.8	39.2	40.3	37.0	1968	34.3
Mexico	44.9	45.9	46.0	43.7	1969	42.2
Panama	37.5	39.8	40.6	38.6	1969	38.0
Puerto Rico	36.6	33.7	31.2	26.7	1969	24.5
Trinidad and Tobago	37.7	38.3	36.9	29.0	1968	27.4
NEAR EAST						
Israel	32.5	27.9	25.5	25.5	1969	26.1
Jordan	45.0	40.1	45.9	48.0	1966	47.8
Tunisia0	30.8	39.9	42.8	42.7	1968	40.4
ASIA						
Ceylon	38.5	36.6	34.9	32.2	1968	31.8
China (Taiwan)	45.9	42.8	37.1	29.7	1969	25.6
Hong Kong	34.2	36.3	32.8	24.2	1969	20.7
Malaysia (West)	44.1	44.4	40.3	36.4	1967	35.3
Ryukyus	35.5	29.2	24.0	21.4	1969	21.5
Singapore	45.5	42.8	35.6	27.0	1969	22.2
OTHER						
Albania	38.9	41.8	40.1	34.9	1968	35.6
Fiji	40.0	40.7	39.2	33.8	1968	30.2
Mauritius	46.2	41.0	38.9	31.8	1969	27.2
aAverage 1965 through last year indicated in column 6.
^The most recent figures are usually provisional and arc subject to later adjustment. Registered births. As corrected for underregistration the average for 1961-64 is 49.1; the average for 1965-68 is 45.4; and the 1968 figure is 43 (7).
Sources: (3-5).
Although all less developed countries with reasonably reliable vital statistics are included in the above discussion, these obviously comprise only a small part of the total population in the less developed regions. They are also unrepresentative in that there is a relationship between development, good statistics, and progress in the demographic transition. However, there is a wider circle of countries, with less reliable statistics, in which various officialding free abortion, has not been given the attention it deserves in the family planning programs of the less developed countries. See Abdel R. Omran, "Abortion in the Demographic Transition," in this volume.